Agglutination Assays of the Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocyte

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1325)

Abstract

The agglutination assay is used to determine the ability of antibodies to recognize parasite variant antigens on the surface of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. In this technique, infected erythrocytes are selectively labelled with a DNA-binding fluorescent dye and mixed with antibodies of interest to allow antibody–surface antigen binding. Recognition of surface antigens by the antibodies can result in the formation of agglutinates containing multiple parasite-infected erythrocytes. These can be viewed and quantified using a fluorescence microscope.

Key words

Agglutination Infected erythrocytes Plasmodium falciparum Variant surface antigens PfEMP1 Malaria Antibody Naturally acquired immunity 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a Wellcome Trust Grant for a 4-Year Ph.D. in Infection, Immunology, and Translational Medicine (for J.T.).

This book chapter was published with permission from the director of KEMRI.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research ProgrammeKilifiKenya
  2. 2.Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of MedicineOxford UniversityOxfordUK

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