Advertisement

Two-Dimensional Immunoelectrophoresis

  • John M. Walker
Protocol
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

Abstract

Two-dimensional (2D) immunoelectrophoresis, also known as crossed immunoelectrophoresis, is a particularly useful technique for the quantitation of one or more proteins in a mixture of proteins and the analysis of the composition of protein mixtures. The method consists of two sequential electrophoretic steps:
  1. 1.

    The first dimension, during which the protein mixture to be analyzed is separated by electrophoresis in an agarose gel.

     
  2. 2.

    The second dimension, during which the separated proteins are electrophoresed at right angles into a freshly applied layer of agarose containing a predetermined amount of antibody.

     

Keywords

Glass Plate Bromophenol Blue Protein Mixture Electrophoresis Buffer Cooling Plate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Laurell, C.-B. (1965) Antigen-antibody crossed electrophoresis. Anal. Biochem. 10, 358.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peeters, H. (ed.) (1967) A quantitative immunoelectrophoresis method, in Protides of the Biological Fluids. Elsevier, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Clarke, H. and Freemann, T. (1968) Quantitative immunoelectrophoresis of human serum proteins. Clin. Sci. 35, 403–413.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Weeke, B. (1970) The serum proteins identified by means of the Laurell cross electrophoresis. Scand. J. Clin. Lab. Invest. 25, 269–275.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Nielsen, J. L., Poulsen, O. M., and Abildtrup, A. (1994) Studies on serum protein complexes with nickel using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Electrophoresis 15,No. 5, 666–671.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hatanaka, K. (1994) A case-report of deficiency in an inhibitor of calcium dependent association of protein-S with C4B-binding protein suggested by a modified cross-immunoelectrophoresis. Thrombosis Res. 74,No. 6, 643–654.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Misset, M. T. and Fonternelle, C. (1993) Antigenic relations among species of the genus ulex L determined by crossed-immunoelectrophoresis. Evolutionary Trends in Plants 7,No. 1, 23–28.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Karpatkin, S., Shulman, S., and Howard, I. (1992) Crossed immunoelectrophoresis of human platelet membranes. Methods Enzymol. 215, 440–455.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Goetz, D. W., Whisman, B. A., and Goetz, A. D. (1992) Crossed immunoelectrophoresis identification of nut cross-reactivities. J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. 91,No. 1, Pt. 2, 360.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of BiosciencesUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK

Personalised recommendations