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Rodent Model of Pediatric Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest

  • Mioara D. Manole
  • Robert W. Hickey
  • Henry L. Alexander
  • Robert S.B. Clark
Protocol
  • 2k Downloads
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

A model of asphyxial cardiac arrest in 17-day old rats is described. This clinically relevant model includes a period of hypoxemia followed by ischemia and resuscitation. Continuous physiologic monitoring is performed before, during, and after the insult. Graded insults produce consistent and dose-dependent brain injury with histological damage and behavioral impairment. The details of the procedures, along with outcome assessments and applications, are discussed.

Keywords

Asphyxia Cardiac arrest Cerebral blood flow Neurodegeneration Sprague-Dawley rat 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mioara D. Manole
    • 1
  • Robert W. Hickey
    • 1
  • Henry L. Alexander
    • 1
  • Robert S.B. Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Emergency MedicineSafar Center for Resuscitation Research, Children's Hospital of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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