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lmmunocytochemistry

  • Lorette C. Javois
Protocol
  • 1k Downloads
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

Abstract

By defimtion, nnmunocytochemistry IS a biomolecular technique that mvolves the use of a specific antibody-antigen reaction to identify cellular constituents in situ The techmque requires that the antibody be tagged with a label to facilitate its visualization Immunocytochemistry is a powerful tool for demonstrating not only the presence of an antigen (cellular constituent) but also its location within a cell, tissue, or organism

Keywords

Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Colloidal Gold Cellular Constituent Chloroauric Acid Size Gold Particle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc , Totowa, NJ. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorette C. Javois
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyThe Catholzc Unzverszty of AmericaWashzngton

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