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Investigation of Whole Cell Meningococcal Glycan Interactions Using High Throughput Glycobiology Techniques: Glycan Array and Surface Plasmon Resonance

  • Tsitsi D. Mubaiwa
  • Lauren E. Hartley-Tassell
  • Evgeny A. Semchenko
  • Christopher J. Day
  • Michael P. Jennings
  • Kate L. SeibEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1969)

Abstract

A growing body of evidence suggests that glycans are important for meningococcal host-pathogen interactions and virulence. The development of glycobiology techniques such as glycan array analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has increased awareness of the importance of glycans in biological processes and has increased the interest of their study. While these techniques are more routinely used with purified proteins, there is growing interest in their applicability to cell-based studies, to better emulate host-pathogen interactions in vivo. Here we describe the use of glycan array analysis and SPR for the investigation of glycan binding by Neisseria meningitidis cells. Used together, these methods can help identify and characterize N. meningitidis glycointeractions.

Key words

Glycobiology Glycan arrays Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council [Career Development Fellowship 1045235 to K.L.S., Principal Research Fellowship 1138466 and Program Grant 1071659 to M.P.J., Project Grant 1099278 to K.L.S. and C.J.D. and Project Grant 1108124 to M.P.J. and C.J.D.].

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsitsi D. Mubaiwa
    • 1
  • Lauren E. Hartley-Tassell
    • 1
  • Evgeny A. Semchenko
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Day
    • 1
  • Michael P. Jennings
    • 1
  • Kate L. Seib
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute for GlycomicsGriffith UniversityGold CoastAustralia

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