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Meningococcal Serogroup A, B, C, W, X, and Y Serum Bactericidal Antibody Assays

  • Jay Lucidarme
  • Jennifer Louth
  • Kelly Townsend-Payne
  • Ray BorrowEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1969)

Abstract

Serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assays measure functional antibody titers against Neisseria meningitidis in sera. Induction of complement-dependent SBA after vaccination with meningococcal polysaccharide or conjugate or protein based vaccines is regarded as the surrogate of protection and thus acceptable evidence of the potential efficacy of these vaccines. This chapter discusses and details SBA assay protocols for measuring the complement-mediated lysis of serogroup A, B, C, W, X, and Y meningococci by human sera, for example, following vaccination or disease.

Key words

Neisseria meningitidis Meningococcal Serum bactericidal antibody Complement Bactericidal 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay Lucidarme
    • 1
  • Jennifer Louth
    • 2
  • Kelly Townsend-Payne
    • 2
  • Ray Borrow
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Meningococcal Reference Unit, National Infection Service, Public Health England, Manchester Medical Microbiology PartnershipManchester Royal InfirmaryManchesterUK
  2. 2.Vaccine Evaluation Unit, National Infection Service, Public Health England, Manchester Medical Microbiology PartnershipManchester Royal InfirmaryManchesterUK

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