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Modeling Growth of Listeria and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Environments

  • Paw DalgaardEmail author
  • Ole Mejlholm
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1918)

Abstract

Predictive food microbiology models can facilitate the assessment and management of microbial food safety. Importantly, the combined effect of storage conditions and product characteristics can be predicted by successfully validated models. This makes it easier and faster to develop or reformulation safe food recipes and predictions can be used to documents safety of available foods. The effect of various product characteristics and storage conditions must be taken into account and extensive mathematical models including the effect of these environmental factors are needed. Here the development, evaluation and application of an extensive growth and growth boundary model for Listeria monocytogenes including the effect of 12 environmental factors as well as the growth dampening effect of lactic acid bacteria is described. The Food Spoilage and Safety Predictor software is used to illustrate how predictions can be applied.

Key words

Predictive food microbiology Simplified cardinal parameter models Interaction between environmental factors ψ-Value Microbial interaction Application software 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Food Microbiology and Hygiene (Research Group), Division of Microbiology and Production, National Food Institute (DTU Food)Technical University of Denmark (DTU)Kongens LyngbyDenmark
  2. 2.Corporate Quality, Royal Greenland Ltd.Svenstrup JDenmark

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