Advertisement

3D Bioprinting pp 111-133 | Cite as

Characterizing Bioinks for Extrusion Bioprinting: Printability and Rheology

  • Cathal O’ConnellEmail author
  • Junxiang Ren
  • Leon Pope
  • Yifan Li
  • Anushree Mohandas
  • Romane Blanchard
  • Serena Duchi
  • Carmine Onofrillo
Protocol
  • 99 Downloads
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2140)

Abstract

In recent years, new technologies based on 3D bioprinting have emerged as ideal tools with which to arrange cells and biomaterials in three dimensions and so achieve tissue engineering’s original goals. The simplest and most widely used form of bioprinting is based on pneumatic extrusion, where 3D structures are built up by drawing patterns of cell-laden or non–cell-laden material through a robotically manipulated syringe. Developing and characterizing new biomaterials for 3D bioprinting (i.e., bioinks) is critical for the progress of the field. This chapter describes a series of protocols for developing, optimizing, and testing new bioinks for extrusion-based 3D bioprinting.

Key words

Bioink 3D Bioprinting Biofabrication Rheology Printability Compressive modulus 

References

  1. 1.
    Vacanti JP, Langer R (1999) Tissue engineering: the design and fabrication of living replacement devices for surgical reconstruction and transplantation. Lancet 354:S32–S34CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kang H-W, Lee SJ, Ko IK et al (2016) A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity. Nat Biotechnol 34:312–319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hospodiuk M, Dey M, Sosnoski D et al (2017) The bioink: a comprehensive review on bioprintable materials. Biotechnol Adv 35:217–239CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Tibbitt MW, Anseth KS (2009) Hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics for 3D cell culture. Biotechnol Bioeng 103(4):655–663CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Therriault D, White SR, J a L (2003) Chaotic mixing in three-dimensional microvascular networks fabricated by direct-write assembly. Nat Mater 2:265–271CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Kolesky DB, Truby RL, Gladman AS et al (2014) 3D bioprinting of vascularized, heterogeneous cell-laden tissue constructs. Adv Mater 26:3124–3130CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Discher DE, Janmey P, Wang Y (2005) Tissue cells feel and respond to the stiffness of their substrate. Science 310:1139–1143CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Engler AJ, M a G, Sen S et al (2004) Myotubes differentiate optimally on substrates with tissue-like stiffness: pathological implications for soft or stiff microenvironments. J Cell Biol 166:877–887CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Saha K, Keung AJ, Irwin EF et al (2008) Substrate modulus directs neural stem cell behavior. Biophys J 95:4426–4438CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Gilbert F, O’Connell CD, Mladenovska T et al (2017) Print me an organ? Ethical and regulatory issues emerging from 3D bioprinting in medicine. Sci Eng Ethics 24(1):73–91CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Schuurman W, Levett PA, Pot MW et al (2013) Gelatin-methacrylamide hydrogels as potential biomaterials for fabrication of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs. Macromol Biosci 13:551–561CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Paxton N, Smolan W, Böck T et al (2017) Proposal to assess printability of bioinks for extrusion-based bioprinting and evaluation of rheological properties governing bioprintability. Biofabrication 9(4):044107CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    O’Connell CD, Di Bella C, Thompson F et al (2016) Development of the Biopen: a handheld device for surgical printing of adipose stem cells at a chondral wound site. Biofabrication 8:15019CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    He Y, Yang F, Zhao H et al (2016) Research on the printability of hydrogels in 3D bioprinting. Sci Rep 6:29977CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Duchi S, Onofrillo C, O’Connell CD et al (2017) Handheld co-axial bioprinting: application to in situ surgical cartilage repair. Sci Rep 7:5837CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Di Bella C, Duchi S, O’Connell CD et al (2017) In situ handheld three-dimensional bioprinting for cartilage regeneration. J Tissue Eng Regen Med 12(3):611–621CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cathal O’Connell
    • 1
    Email author
  • Junxiang Ren
    • 1
  • Leon Pope
    • 1
  • Yifan Li
    • 1
  • Anushree Mohandas
    • 1
  • Romane Blanchard
    • 1
    • 2
  • Serena Duchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Carmine Onofrillo
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.BioFab3D@ACMDSt Vincent’s Hospital MelbourneFitzroyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of SurgerySt Vincent’s Hospital, University of MelbourneFitzroyAustralia

Personalised recommendations