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An Overview of Advances in Cell-Based Cancer Immunotherapies Based on the Multiple Immune-Cancer Cell Interactions

  • Jialing Zhang
  • Stephan S. Späth
  • Sherman M. Weissman
  • Samuel G. KatzEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2097)

Abstract

Tumors have a complex ecosystem in which behavior and fate are determined by the interaction of diverse cancerous and noncancerous cells at local and systemic levels. A number of studies indicate that various immune cells participate in tumor development (Fig. 1). In this review, we will discuss interactions among T lymphocytes (T cells), B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In addition, we will touch upon attempts to either use or block subsets of immune cells to target cancer.

Keywords

Immunotherapy Adoptive cell therapy Immune cells 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jialing Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephan S. Späth
    • 3
  • Sherman M. Weissman
    • 2
  • Samuel G. Katz
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of PathologyYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of GeneticsYale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.University of TübingenTübingenGermany

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