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Optical Measurement of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion and Its Inhibition by Inositol Pyrophosphate in Primary Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

  • Sung Hyun KimEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2091)

Abstract

Optical molecular and cellular imaging has provided considerable information in various life science research fields. In particular, pHluorin-based assays allow us to specifically investigate presynaptic physiological processes, such as synaptic transmission and synaptic retrieval. Here, I describe quantitative synaptic transmission in primary cultured hippocampal neurons using a vGlut-pHluorin system combined with a high-fidelity optical imaging system and its regulation by inositol pyrophosphate.

Key words

Synaptic transmission Synaptic vesicle vGlut-pHluorin (vG-pH) Inositol pyrophosphate IP6K 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea Grant 2017R1A2B4007019 funded by the Ministry of Science and Information and Communication Technology.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physiology, School of MedicineKyung Hee UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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