Local Delivery Methods Into the CNS

  • Timothy W. Vogel
  • Jeffrey N. Bruce

Abstract

The earliest forms of therapeutic drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) were systemically based intravenous and oral preparations. Despite attempts to increase target concentrations with intraarterial delivery or osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), systemic delivery remains hindered by systemic toxicity and the need for extensive drug modification for effective (80) BBB penetration. These limitations have provided the impetus for developing strategies of localized treatment for CNS disorders, to circumvent the BBB and increase local drug concentration without systemic toxicity.

Keywords

Catheter Convection Morphine Paclitaxel Methotrexate 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Timothy W. Vogel
    • 1
  • Jeffrey N. Bruce
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew York

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