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Role of TGF-β and IGF in Tumor Progression and Bone Metastases

  • Erin Giles
  • Gurmit Singh
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Drug Discovery and Development book series (CDD&D)

Abstract

Metastatic disease contributes to a large proportion of cancer-related deaths, and bone is among the most common sites for metastases for tumors originating in the breast and prostate. The propensity for these cancers to form bone metastases is not completely understood; however, it undoubtedly involves a number of unique characteristics of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Such an explanation was proposed more than a decade ago with Paget’s “seed and soil” hypothesis, which suggested that meta-static cells are dispersed throughout the body, yet they will only survive and grow upon reaching tissues that are optimal for their growth (reviewed in ref. 1).

Keywords

Bone Metastasis Osteolytic Bone Metastasis Transform Growth Factor Beta Type TGFbeta Signaling Mink Lung Epithelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erin Giles
    • 1
  • Gurmit Singh
    • 2
  1. 1.McMaster University/Juravinski Cancer CentreHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Pathology and Molecular MedicineJuravinski Cancer Centre, McMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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