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Surgical Revascularization in the Management of Heart Failure and Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

  • Jeffrey J. Teuteberg
  • James C. Fang
Part of the Contemporary Cardiology book series (CONCARD)

Abstract

More than 5 million Americans have congestive heart failure, and 550,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. This condition results in almost 1 million hospital discharges and more than 50,000 deaths a year at a cost of $28.8 billion (1). Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains a leading cause of heart failure. Since the early trials of surgical vs medical management of coronary artery disease in the late 1970s, there have been substantial changes in the surgical techniques and the medical management of chronic CAD, acute coronary syndromes, and heart failure.

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Myocardial Viability Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Surgical Revascularization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey J. Teuteberg
    • 1
  • James C. Fang
    • 2
  1. 1.Cardiovascular Division, Department of MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBoston
  2. 2.Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women’s HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBoston

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