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Harnessing the State: Rebalancing Strategies for Monitoring and Motivation

  • Peter Evans
Part of the Political Evolution and Institutional Change book series (PEIC)

Abstract

Debating strategies for harnessing the state to the service of the common ends of its citizens is a perennial obligation of political theorists and practical politicians.On the one hand,societies must continually rethink ways of ensuring that the powers and legitimacy of state apparatuses are not appropriated for predatory purposes by private elites (and their allies within the apparatus itself ).At the same time, societies must continually search for positive solutions to the problem of control—trying to find ways of making sure that those within the state apparatus have the information, capacity,and motivation required to implement societal goals.

Keywords

Public Institution Collective Good Ordinary Citizen Market Signal Democratic Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Matthew Lange and Dietrich Rueschemeyer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Evans

There are no affiliations available

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