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Framing the Discussion of African American-Latino Relations: A Review and Analysis

  • John J. Betancur

Abstract

This chapter studies African American-Latino relations in the United States. Drawing on existing literature, it examines their nature, dimensions, and methodological questions while, at the same time, advancing some proposals. Still in its infancy, the study of African American-Latino relations has profited from its white-African American counterpart. At the same time, it has reflected the shortcomings of that debate and construct, Forecasts estimate that minorities will constitute around 50 percent of the U.S. population in the year 2050 (McLeod, 1996). A large recent inflow of migrants from the Third World is already altering U.S. racial dynamics deeply Under these circumstances, the discussion assumes an increasing role and urgency in the construction of more desirable relations. The following is an attempt in that direction.

Keywords

Publishing Company Affirmative Action African American Community Race Relation White Privilege 
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Copyright information

© Anani Dzidzienyo and Suzanne Oboler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. Betancur

There are no affiliations available

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