Racial Politics in Multiethnic America: Black and Latina/o Identities and Coalitions

  • Mark Sawyer

Abstract

In Little Havana, Miami, a young Afro-Cuban woman went into a “Cuban” hair salon seeking to make an appointment, She politely asked in Spanish how she might make an appointment to have her hair done. The proprietor of the salon snapped back in English, “We don’t work on Black hair here—you will have to go somewhere else.” The women in the salon then went back to conversing in Spanish and the Afro-Cuban woman left dejected.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Assimilation Argentina Defend Metaphor 

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Copyright information

© Anani Dzidzienyo and Suzanne Oboler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Sawyer

There are no affiliations available

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