Interminority Relations in Legislative Settings: The Case of African Americans and Latinos

  • José E. Cruz

Abstract

Historically, the most important aspect of race relations in the United States has been the reluctance of Anglo-whites to accept other ethnic groups as their equals. Codified in 1789 as the “three-fifths” clause of Article I of the Constitution, this attitude guided political practice for one hundred years after the abolition of slavery by the Thirteenth Amendment and for nearly a century after the Fifteenth Amendment established the right of citizens to vote regardless of race.

Keywords

Clay Triad Arena Decen Lost 

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Copyright information

© Anani Dzidzienyo and Suzanne Oboler 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • José E. Cruz

There are no affiliations available

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