Scripting Race, Finding Place: African Americans, Afro-Cubans, and the Diasporic Imaginary in the United States

  • Nancy Raquel Mirabal

Abstract

The historical question of race, of its multiple articulations and meanings, figured greatly in the shared trans-American visions of Cuban diasporic movement, geography, and self. An important element in the re-historicizing of experience was the theoretical reworkings of what constitutes “historical diasporic blackness” from multiple vantage points. Critical to this analysis was the creation of a dialogue—loosely defined as speeches, newspapers, journals, pamphlets, and recorded club activity—that influenced how the Cuban nation was historically reimagined outside of Cuba by Cuban migrants and exiles. Key to this reimagining was the redefinition of “blackness” in relation to the Cuban national project, while at the same time calling for the erasure of “blackness” in the development of a shared Cuban nationalist identity This historical dilemma of racial discourse and Cuban nation building inspired the Cuban poet Nicolas Guillén to note that the “problem of the Cuban Black is simply cultural” (1929).

Keywords

Sugar Migration Depression Europe Steam 

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Copyright information

© Anani Dzidzienyo and Suzanne Oboler 2005

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  • Nancy Raquel Mirabal

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