Is the Spirit Gendered?: Fluid Gender, Sex Change, and Same-Sex Marriage

  • Ruth Vanita

Abstract

Sushila’s view of marriage as a union of two souls would be accepted by most Hindus in India and also by many Christians in the West. However, not all would agree with her conclusion that since the soul is not gendered, a marriage between two men or two women is permissible. In this chapter, I discuss the implications of the soul’s genderlessness for the possibility of same-sex marriage, and examine some traditional ideas of human-divine same-sex marriage. While these concepts refer to levels of reality beyond day-to-day embodiment, I argue that they are available to people who respond to the present-day phenomenon of same-sex marriage.

Keywords

Dust Depression Mercury Europe Tate 

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Chapter 3 Is the Spirit Gendered?: Fluid Gender, Sex Change, and Same-Sex Marriage

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© Ruth Vanita 2005

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  • Ruth Vanita

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