Carlo Tresca pp 103-112 | Cite as

Postwar Activities

  • Nunzio Pernicone
Part of the Italian and Italian American Studies book series (IIAS)

Abstract

Tresca’s most notable accomplishment amidst repression and the threat of deportation was the launching of his third independent newspaper, Il Martello (The Hammer?, the most important publication of his journalistic career. True testament to Il Martello’? status as the premier Italian radical newspaper of the 1920s was provided by the enemy that knew best—the Italian Fascists. The consul general of New York informed the ambassador in 1925 that “the most dangerous [of the subversive newspapers], because of the skillful manner in which it is edited, and because of its influence over certain elements of the people, is Il Martell?, published for years by the noted Carlo Tresca, who knows the mentality of the subversives.”1

Keywords

Furnace Depression Assure Gall Dine 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    For a good account of the ambiance of this radical district, see Vanni B. Montana, Amarostico: Testimoniance euro-american? ( Livorno: U. Bastogi Editore, 1975 ), 96–108.Google Scholar
  2. 10.
    Goldberg, A Tale of Three Citie?, 83–100, 107–110; Rudolph J. Vecoli, “Anthony Capraro and the Lawrence Strike of 1919,” in George E. Pozzetta, ed., Pane e Lavoro: The Italian American Working Clas? ( Toronto: The Multicultural History Society of Ontario, 1980 ), 3–7.Google Scholar
  3. 14.
    Goldberg, A Tale of Three Citie?, 101–103; Vecoli, “Anthony Capraro and the Lawrence Strike of 1919, ” 10–13; Vittorio Buttis, Memorie di vita di tempeste social? ( Chicago: Comitato “Vittorio Buttis;” 1940 ), 104–105.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Nunzio Pernicone 2005

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  • Nunzio Pernicone

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