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The Evolution of a Community of Practice: Stakeholders and Service in Management 101

  • Jordi Comas
  • Tammy Bunn Hiller
  • John Miller

Abstract

Sandy enters the Forum—a large lecture hall—on the first day of her introduction to organization and management class, MG 101. She stares up at more than a hundred fellow students. Having heard rumors of the hard work this course entails, Sandy nervously seeks out friends from her sorority to sit beside. As she heads toward her friends, an upper level student teaching assistant directs her to sit in her “company,” one of four sections of about 30 students who will complete three projects together: a service project, a business project to fund the service, and a reporting project to document and interpret the experiences of both. Sandy moves to sit in Company C. Within four weeks, she and her fellow company members decide to create a new after-school computer lab at a local community center, funded by the sale of 400 custom-designed soccer scarves. The process of selecting their service and business projects has forced Sandy and her company members to brainstorm project ideas, research alternatives, advocate for a position, form coalitions, and reach a final decision. The next several weeks are spent designing their company organization, assigning jobs, planning their operations, carrying out their projects, and managing the dozens of unexpected issues and problems that arise.

Keywords

Management Education Stakeholder Theory Social Learning Theory Social Entrepreneur Stakeholder Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dan W. Butin 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jordi Comas
  • Tammy Bunn Hiller
  • John Miller

There are no affiliations available

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