Preparing for the Craft of Policy Analysis

The Capstone Experience
  • Peter deLeon
  • Spiros Protopsaltis

Abstract

The “capstone seminar”—that is, the culminating class in most masters of public affairs, administration, management or policy programs—reflects a developmental history going back at least to the geneses of graduate programs in public administration, law and business administration. Its near-universal appeal (especially important given a wide set of variations), however, is due to its central idea, that is, a seminar that transcends the individual academic disciplines and reinforces the Wildavskian ideal of “policy as a craft,” a pedagogic exercise that urges the student to think creatively in an intuitive and clinical manner.

Key words

capstone craft curriculum public affairs Wildavsky 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allard, Scott W. and Jeffrey D. Straussman. 2003. Managing intensive student consulting capstone projects: The Maxwell School experience. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 22(4) (Fall): 689–701.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amy, Douglas J. 1984. Why policy analysis and ethics are incompatible. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 3(4) (Summer): 573–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chetkovich, Carol and David L. Kirp. 2001. Cases and controversies: How novitiates are trained to be masters of the public policy universe. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 20(2) (Summer): 283–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cohen, Steven, William Eimicke and Jacob Ukeles. 1995. Teaching the craft of policy and management analysis: The workshop sequence of Columbia University’s Graduate Program in Public Policy and Administration. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 14(4) (Fall): 551–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. deLeon, Peter. 1988. Advice and Consent. New York: The Russell Sage Foundation.Google Scholar
  6. Dror, Yehezkel. 1967. Policy analysts: A new professional role in government. Public Administration Review 27(3): 197–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. —. 1984. Policy Analysis for Advising Rulers. In Rethinking the Process of Operational Research and Systems Analysis. Rolfe Tomlinson and Istvan Kiss, eds. Oxford: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  8. Fesler, James W. 1946. Public Administration as a Special Field. In The University Bureaus of Public Administration. The University of Alabama Bureaus of Public Administration.Google Scholar
  9. Flynn, Theresa A., Jodi R. Sandfort and Sally Coleman Seiden. 2001. A three-dimensional approach to learning in public management. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 20(3) (Fall): 551–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Frederickson, H. George. 1971. Toward a New Public Administration. In Toward a New Public Administration. Frank Marini, ed. Scranton, PA: Chandler.Google Scholar
  11. Geva-May, Iris, with Aaron Wildavsky. 1997. An Operational Approach to Policy Analysis: The Craft. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Glazer, Nathan. 1974. Schools of the minor profession. Minerva 12(3): 346–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Goldhamer, Herbert. 1978. The Adviser. New York: American Elsevier.Google Scholar
  14. Jennings, Edward T., Jr. 2003. Capstone project symposium. Journal of Public Affairs Education 9(1) (January): 43–4.Google Scholar
  15. Lasswell, Harold D. 1951. The Policy Orientation. In The Policy Sciences. Daniel Lerner and Harold D. Lasswell, eds. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  16. —. 1971. A Pre-View of Policy Sciences. New York: American Elsevier.Google Scholar
  17. Lasswell, Harold D. and Abraham Kaplan. 1950. Power and Society. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Lindblom, Charles E. 1959. The Handling of Norms in Policy Analysis. In The Allocation of Economic Resources. Paul A. Baran et al., eds. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Lynn, Laurence E., Jr. 1999. Teaching & Learning with Cases: A Guidebook. New York: Chatham House Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. —. 2001. The customer is always wrong. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 20(2) (Summer): 337–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. MacRae, Duncan, Jr. and Dale Whittington. 1997. Expert Advice for Policy Choice. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Majone, Giandomenico. 1989. Evidence, Argument and Persuasion in the Policy Process. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Meltsner, Arnold J. 1990. Rules for Rulers. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Merton, Robert K. 1949. The role of applied social science in the formation of policy. Philosophy of Science 16(3) (July): 161–81.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Moore, Wilbert. 1970. The Professions. New York: The Russell Sage Foundation.Google Scholar
  26. Quade, Edward S., ed. 1964. Analysis for Military Decisions. Santa Monica, CA: The RAND Corporation. R-387-PR.Google Scholar
  27. Radin, Beryl A. 2000. Beyond Machiavelli: Policy Analysis Comes of Age. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Scheer, Teva J. 2000. The distant learning revolution: An assessment of its effect on public administration graduate students. Doctoral dissertation at the Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado (Denver).Google Scholar
  29. Schön, Donald A. 1983. The Reflective Practitioner. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  30. Smith, Bruce L.R. 1966. The RAND Corporation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Stein, Harold, ed. 1948. Public Administration and Policy Development. New York: Harcourt, Brace.Google Scholar
  32. Strunk, William, Jr. and E.B. White. 1972. The Elements of Style. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  33. US News & World Report. 2001. Best graduate schools: Public affairs rankings, tools, and articles. Online: <www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/pub/pubindex_brief.php>.Google Scholar
  34. Vining, Aidan R. and David L. Weimer. 2002. Introducing policy analysis craft: The sheltered workshop. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management 21(4) (Fall): 697–707.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Waldo, Dwight. 1992 [1980]. The Enterprise of Public Administration: A Summary View. Novato, CA: Chandler & Sharpe.Google Scholar
  36. Weimer, David L. and Aidan R. Vining. 1999. Policy Analysis: Concepts and Practice. 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  37. Wildavsky, Aaron. 1979. Speaking Truth to Power: The Art and Craft of Policy Analysis. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Iris Geva-May 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter deLeon
  • Spiros Protopsaltis

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations