The South

Race, Religion, and Republican Domination
  • Donald W. Beachler

Abstract

The 2004 election continued the recent pattern of Republican dominance of the politics of the American South. For the second straight election, George W. Bush carried all 13 southern states and consequently received all of the region’s electoral votes. In 2000 and 2004, Bush won all the southern states despite the fact that a southerner, Al Gore of Tennessee, headed the Democratic ticket in 2000 and North Carolina Senator John Edwards was the Democratic vice presidential choice in 2004. In 2000, Bush’s sweep of the South netted him 163 electoral votes. The reapportionment of House seats following the 2000 census gave the South 168 electoral votes for the 2004 election. The South is by no means the only Republican region of the country, but it is interesting to note that, outside the South, Al Gore won 267 electoral votes compared to 108 for Bush in 2000. In 2004, John Kerry won 252 electoral votes outside the South, while the nonsouthern states captured by Bush provided him with 114 electoral votes. The South put George W. Bush in the White House and it was the South that kept him there.

Keywords

Clay Depression Transportation Amid Beach 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Kevin J. McMahon, David M. Rankin, Donald W. Beachler, and John Kenneth White 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald W. Beachler

There are no affiliations available

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