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Contentious Peasants, Paternalist State, and Arrested Capitalism in China’s Long Eighteenth Century

  • Ho-Fung Hung
Part of the The Evolutionary Processes in World Politics Series book series (EPWP)

Abstract

Now it is widely recognized that the “rise of the West” and the “fall of the East” were two complementary, mutually constitutive processes. But when and how the East, China in particular, fell behind Europe is a topic of continuing debate. Janet Abu-Lughod’s (1989) and Mark Elvin’s (1973) contention that China turned stagnant after its fifteenth-century retreat from the maritime world is recently challenged by Frank and others. It is shown that China’s post-medieval economic slowdown was only temporary, and was soon followed by a resurgence of commerce and productivity growth in the early modern period (Frank 1998;Atwell 1998; Goldstone 2000).

Keywords

Eighteenth Century Qing Dynasty Ming Dynasty Local Elite Early Modern Period 
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© Christopher Chase-Dunn and E. N. Anderson 2005

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  • Ho-Fung Hung

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