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The Rise of European Hegemony: The Political Economy of South Asia and Europe Compared, A.D. 1200–A.D. 1500

  • Eric Mielants
Part of the The Evolutionary Processes in World Politics Series book series (EPWP)

Abstract

In her study on the world-system, Janet Abu-Lughod (1989) titled her paragraph on South Asia: “On the Way to Everywhere.” The heading indicates that the socioeconomic developments occurring in South Asia had the possibility of going in any direction. Yet in her contribution she does not elaborate upon the long-term impacts of social structures and historical developments that surround elite economic strategies. This was, however, a major element in the subsequent patterns of social change in South Asia. To what extent did the different path dependencies of the political economies of South Asia and Europe explain why European powers were capable of imposing their hegemony over South Asia, rather than vice versa?

Keywords

Indian Ocean Thirteenth Century Indian Ocean Region Maritime Trade Merchant Guild 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Christopher Chase-Dunn and E. N. Anderson 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Mielants

There are no affiliations available

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