News Coverage of the Bosnian War in Dutch Newspapers

Impact and Implications
  • Nel Ruigrok
  • Jan A. de Ridder
  • Otto Scholten

Abstract

In April 1992 war in Bosnia broke out. Media coverage was initially modest, but eventually the war received full media attention after the discovery of detention camps in Bosnia. Images of emaciated men behind barbed wire shown worldwide on television provoked memories of pictures from the death camps of World War II and a public outcry to “do something” followed.

Keywords

Fatigue Europe Flare Beach Sorting 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Philip Seib 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nel Ruigrok
  • Jan A. de Ridder
  • Otto Scholten

There are no affiliations available

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