The Internet, Politics, and Missile Defense

  • Jayne Rodgers

Abstract

One downloadable poster by missile defense1 activists depicts a smiling George W. Bush with a laughing Paul Martin, the Canadian prime minister. Labeled “Dumb and Dumber,” with reference to the 1994 movie of the same name, an arrow pointing to Bush says “Started missile defense again” and one to Martin stating “He wants Canada to participate …”2 A postcard on the same website, with an image of an astronaut floating above earth, is addressed to Paul Martin, and is labeled “Earth to Paul! Keep Weapons Out of Space—Keep Canada Out of Missile Defence.”3 Posters and postcards with variations on these themes are common on activist sites worldwide, and are often preprinted with protest text and addressed directly to the minister responsible for security policy. Activism against missile defense, like many other civil campaigns of this kind, is simultaneously entertaining and deadly serious, and provides an opportunity for social engagement around issues of profound human consequence.

Keywords

Europe Income Radar Arena Defend 

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Notes

  1. 4.
    Barry Axford and Richard Huggins, eds., New Media and Politics (London, Thousand Oaks, New Delhi: Sage, 2001);Google Scholar
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    Craig Wartenkin, Reshaping World Politics—NGOs, the Internet, and Global Civil Society (Lanham, Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001), p. 23.Google Scholar
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    Sandor Vegh, “Classifying Forms of Online Activism—The Case of Cyberprotests Against the World Bank,” in Martha McCaughey and Michael D. Ayers, eds., Cyberactivism—Online Activism in Theory and Practice (New York, London: Routledge, 2003), p. 72.Google Scholar
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    Jayne Rodgers, Spatializing International Politics Analysing Activism on the Internet (London, New York: Routledge, 2003), p. 73.Google Scholar
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    David Silver, “Current Directions and Future Questions,” in Martha McCaughey and Michael D. Ayers, eds., Cyberactivism—Online Activism in Theory and Practice (New York, London: Routledge, 2003), p. 280.Google Scholar
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    James Downton Jr. and Paul Wehr, “Persistent Pacifism: How Activist Commitment is Developed and Sustained,” Journal of Peace Research, Vol. 35, No. 5 (1998), p. 539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Philip Seib 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jayne Rodgers

There are no affiliations available

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