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The Globe and the Ghetto

  • Fleur E. Johns

Abstract

The term global evokes a single, spherical shape. Above all, “globalism” and its etymological siblings lay claim to comprehensiveness. Compare the terms “internationalism” and “transnationalism.” Both these suggest a bridging of space between nationals and nations. They evoke a sense of exchange and conflict between territorially and politically distinct sites. Similarly, “cosmopolitanism” suggests a “politan” (from the Greek polites, citizen) acting within a “cosmo” (from the Greek kosmos, universe). This term implies a sense of locale or rootedness, ideological or spatial. In contrast, the term “global” is notable for its claim to uprooted wholeness. Commensurate with this semantic posture, contemporary scholarship on “global governance” lays claim to a field of extraordinary compass (see, e.g., Hall and Biersteker 2003; Hewson and Sinclair 1999; Held 2000; Held and McGrew 2002; Mendes and Mehmet 2003; Nye and Donahue 2000).

Keywords

Corporate Governance Sixteenth Century Global Governance Contemporary Account Semantic Posture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Markus Lederer and Philipp S. Müller 2005

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  • Fleur E. Johns

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