Inside Global Governance: New Borders of a Concept

  • Konrad Späth

Abstract

Concepts matter in the way we conceive of our world. Global governance is no exception. What is more, concepts fundamentally shape our social reality and constitute the boundaries of what is possible and what is not. Global governance—as such a concept—opens up our social reality to new opportunities and choices while simultaneously excluding previously available options. This chapter engages with the political implications of “talking global governance.” Instead of looking for an appropriate definition that is presumably able to correspond to real-world features and to reflect the nature of global governance “as it is,” this chapter engages with the conceptual basis of global governance and shows what this means in political terms. As a possible answer to the question of political order, it is argued, global governance provides a concurrent model to state sovereignty as the basic principle of political organization.

Keywords

Resis Tral Clarification Univer Metaphor 

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© Markus Lederer and Philipp S. Müller 2005

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  • Konrad Späth

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