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Introduction

  • Joy Hendry

Abstract

This book, and the study on which it is based, were inspired by the transformation described in the Prologue. It is not specifically about the Ainu people—there are Ainu working on their own representation now, and there are growing sources of information in various media. But the Ainu are not the only contemporary people who were almost obliterated from the consciousness of the wider public, and I was further guided into devising the project by the words of an Ainu woman who sought to account for the growth in her people’s confidence. She explained, with an expression of some content,

We discovered that there are other peoples in the world who had been largely erased from their country’s memories. We are in touch with each other now, and we are all learning to feel pride in our ancestry again.

Keywords

Native People National Museum Wide Public Cultural Tourism Museum Curator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References And Further Readings

  1. Bedard, Joanna, 1992, “Foreward,” in Deborah Doxtator (ed.), 1988, Fluffs and Feathers: An Exhibit on the Symbols of Indianness; A Resource Guide, Brantford, Ontario: Woodland Cultural Centre.Google Scholar
  2. Bocock, Robert, 1992, “The Cultural Formations of Modern Society,” in Stuart Hall and Bram Gieben (eds.), The Formations of Modernity, Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 229–274.Google Scholar
  3. Dore, Ronald, 1973, British Factory-Japanese Factory: The Origins of National Diversity in Industrial Relations, Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  4. Doxtator, Deborah, 1988, “The Home of Indian Culture and Other Stories in the Museum,” Muse, VI (3): 26–28.Google Scholar
  5. Hendry, Joy, 2000, The Orient Strikes Back, Oxford: Berg.Google Scholar
  6. Hill, Richard W., 2000, “The Museum Indian: Still Frozen in Time and Mind,” Museum News, 79(3): 40–44.Google Scholar
  7. Hill, Torn V., 1992, “Preface” in Deborah Doxtator (ed.), 1988, Fluffs and Feathers: An Exhibit on the Symbols of Indianness; A Resource Guide, Brantford, Ontario: Woodland Cultural Centre.Google Scholar
  8. Matsunaga, Louella, 2004, “The Branding of Space,” in H. Nakamaki (ed.), A Comparison of Management Culture in Japan and the UK: Focusing on Religion and Museum, Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology.Google Scholar
  9. Phillips, Ruth, 1990, “The Public Relations Wrap: What We Can Learn from The Spirit Sings,” Inuit Art Quarterly (Spring): 13–21.Google Scholar
  10. Sahlins, Marshall, 1999, “Two or Three Things that I Know about Culture,” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (N.S.), 5: 399–421.Google Scholar
  11. Smith, Linda Tuhiwai, 1999, Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples, New York: Zed Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  12. Street, Brian, 1992, ‘British Popular Anthropology: Exhibiting and Photographing the Other,“ in Elizabeth Edwards (ed.), Anthropology and Photography, 1860–1920, New Haven, Connecticut and London: Yale University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Joy Hendry 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joy Hendry

There are no affiliations available

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