Abstract

While the first part of Le Morte Darthur is focused on the king’s court, later sections switch to focus on how individual knights create local communities or adjust their places in already existing communities. The focus is not on England’s place in the world, but on individuals’ and regions’ places within England. While Launcelot must earn a place in the English community, Gareth, as nephew to the king, is guaranteed access to the king; however, as Gawain’s little brother, his place in the political structure of the realm is depressingly predetermined. To alter it, he must find not royal favor but royal respect.1 Trystram, on the other hand, is an eldest son, but he is born far away from the cultural center. He must simultaneously establish himself in the regional community of Cornwall and find a place in the national hierarchy that does not force him to abandon his local ties. For both knights, love is not just a personal endeavor but a form of public display that helps determine political alliances.

Keywords

Expense Bors Arena Defend Stake 

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Notes

  1. 2.
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© Kenneth Hodges 2005

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  • Kenneth Hodges

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