Psychoneurological Dimensions of Anomalous Experience in Relation to Religious Belief and Spiritual Practic

  • Stanley Krippner

Abstract

For several years, I have been interested in the Brazilian churches that use a particular mind-altering brew as a sacrament. This brew is referred to as “ayahuasca,”“yage,”“hoasca,” etc., depending on the part of the country in which one encounters it. I am often invited to participate in evening ceremonies by the church elders, and one visit was especially memorable.

Keywords

Fatigue Depression Coherence Posit Eter 

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