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Overcoming an Impoverished Ontology: Candrakirti and the Mind–Brain Problem

  • Richard K. Payne

Abstract

In my mid-twenties, I spent a couple of months of one summer working alone, constructing a retaining wall made of broken concrete block.While doing this work, I took to contemplating, as if it were a koan, the question, “If there is no self, then what is reincarnated?”

Keywords

Cognitive Neuroscience Vitalist Argument Mental Force Cognitive Linguistic Dependent Origination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kelly Bulkeley 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard K. Payne

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