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Carla Del Ponte “Axed”

  • Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu

Abstract

Awe have seen in chapter 3, when the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) was established in 1994, its statute prescribed that the chief prosecutor of the Hague tribunal would also be the chief prosecutor of the Arusha tribunal.1 Thus for much of the past decade, the two tribunals had a common prosecutor. On August 28, 2003, the Security Council decided that the Arusha tribunal should now have its own full-time prosecutor, splitting the chief prosecutorial post and effectively removing Carla Del Ponte as chief prosecutor of the Arusha tribunal against her wishes.2 Del Ponte (figure 6.1) was nevertheless reappointed as chief prosecutor at The Hague.

Keywords

United Nation Security Council International Criminal Court Great Lake Region International Criminal Tribunal 
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6 Carla Del Ponte “Axed”

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Copyright information

© Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu 2005

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  • Kingsley Chiedu Moghalu

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