Surveying Indigenous Knowledge, the Curriculum, and Development in Africa: A Critical African Viewpoint

  • Nkosinathi Mkosi

Abstract

This chapter is not meant to provide answers to the varied perceived problems identified and proffered by scholars and academicians pertinent to indigenous knowledge, nor is it intended to cause rapture in the indigenous knowledge discourses. Having said this, I have to note that I do make attempts at providing suggestions as to how some of the problems could be tackled. As well, what I do here is to add a critical voice to the calls for the acknowledgment of the possibilities of indigenous knowledge to ameliorate the woes experienced by the poor marginalized African communities. The principle agenda of this chapter is to gain vital insights in and exposure on indigenous knowledge as a discursive practice. Subsumed are the objectives to critically analyze the construct indigenous knowledge, and to explore its limitations as well as its possibilities and implications for education and development with particular reference to Africa. To realize these goals, I first provide a synoptic historico-descriptive analysis of indigenous knowledge. Then will follow an investigation of the epistemological foundations and processes perceived to distinguish indigenous knowledge from Western knowledge. A critique of indigenous knowledge will then

Keywords

Posit Tate Harness Folk Glean 

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Copyright information

© Ali A. Abdi and Ailie Cleghorn 2005

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  • Nkosinathi Mkosi

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