Sovereignty of States and Similar Entities: A Conceptual Analysis

  • Ersun N. Kurtulus

Abstract

What does sovereignty as a descriptive concept refer to at the level of states and similar entities? Since, in epistemological terms, any concept may refer to any phenomenon at any level, the first step in the analysis must be a certain modification of this question: what does sovereignty, or more precisely, terms like “state sovereignty,” “sovereign statehood,” or “sovereignty of states and similar entities”1 reasonably refer to when employed as a nonnormative, analytical tool at the level of states and similar entities? To introduce reason in this fashion opens the way for an attempt to apply a loosely defined set of criteria, such as analytical utility generated by a high degree of precision, logical coherence, consistency with previous usage, and relative imperviousness to rhetorical abuse, to an apparently fruitless discussion. To speak about nonnormative, analytical tools, on the other hand, delimits the analysis to the sources of actual and potential controversies to be found in those scientific disciplines that endeavor to understand the referent of the concept.

Keywords

Coherence Turkey Tate Dition Arena 

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Notes

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© Ersun N. Kurtulus 2005

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  • Ersun N. Kurtulus

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