A Comfortable Home: Globalization and Changing Gender Roles in the Fight against HIV/AIDS

  • Joanne Csete
Chapter

Abstract

HIV/AIDS is the disease of globalization par excellence. It has thrived as a pandemic in the era of globalization in part because it is driven by factors that are the defining traits of globalization, including rapid international movement of goods and capital, migration of labor, deepening income disparity and poverty, and economic and political transitions at the end of the Cold War.1 Increased migrant labor, a booming international trade in sex, and trafficking of persons are features of globalization, with all the HIV risk that these entail. The fall of the Soviet Union brought the opening of trade routes for the opiates of south central Asia as well as massive unemployment and desperation, leading to unprecedented increases in drug use and in the numbers of women and children in the sex trade. A globalized world appears to provide a comfortable home for an AIDS pandemic that shows few signs of slowing.2

Keywords

Migration Europe Income Tuberculosis Expense 

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© Ilona Kickbusch, Kari A. Hartwig, and Justin M. List 2005

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  • Joanne Csete

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