Women, Health, and Globalization: A Critical Social Movement Perspective

  • Manisha Desai
Chapter

Abstract

The identification and international spread of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) in early 2003, made it is easy to see the globalization of health and disease. But what the intense media coverage of SARS shows, as Paul Farmer notes eloquently in his article on “SARS and Inequality” in The Nation,1 is one of the most troubling aspects of global health policies in the last decade, namely the hijacking of health as a means for global trade and economic growth. Were SARS not so prevalent in regions vital to global trade (China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong), would it be receiving the same attention?

Keywords

Depression Europe Income Tuberculosis Stratification 

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Notes

  1. 2.
    I use Melucci’s definition of a social movement. For him movements are ongoing constructions of collective action and identity, always in progress. They are fragmented, heterogeneous constructions including a diverse set of organizational forms, ideologies, and identities. They are continually reconstructed through diffuse, decentralized subterranean networks. They aim to bring about social change based on myriad strategies and ideological positions. What makes such fragmented heterogeneous activity a movement is the self-identification with a larger web of feminist activism. See A. Melucci (1999), Challenging Codes: Collective Action in the Information Age, Cambridge, UK: CUP.Google Scholar
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© Ilona Kickbusch, Kari A. Hartwig, and Justin M. List 2005

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  • Manisha Desai

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