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Globalization, Health, and the Engendering of Resistance in Everyday Life

  • Jerry Spiegel
  • Cynthia Lee Andruske
Chapter

Abstract

The term “globalization” has become commonplace in the vocabulary of the twenty-first century. However, depending on one’s gender, geographic location, and position within the social hierarchy, perspectives on this phenomenon vary considerably. While global forces at play in domains such as economics, trade, work, and the environment are extensively discussed at a “macro” level, an emerging challenge for researchers has been to discern the pathways of globalization in the daily lives and health of individuals and communities.

Keywords

Assisted Reproductive Technology Middle Eastern British Columbia Male Infertility Stroke Survivor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Ilona Kickbusch, Kari A. Hartwig, and Justin M. List 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry Spiegel
  • Cynthia Lee Andruske

There are no affiliations available

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