The Pathways between Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health: A Review of the Literature and Some Propositions for Research and Action

  • Caren Grown
Chapter

Abstract

There is, by now, a fairly large literature on the relationship between globalization and health.1 Within this literature, however, there is relatively little attention given to the implications of the liberalization of international trade, one aspect of globalization, for reproductive health, which is a subset of overall health.2 This chapter considers the linkages between trade liberalization and provision of and access to sexual and reproductive health services.

Keywords

Migration Tuberculosis Explosive Turkey Malaria 

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© Ilona Kickbusch, Kari A. Hartwig, and Justin M. List 2005

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