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Understanding Gender, Health, and Globalization: Opportunities and Challenges

  • Lesley Doyal
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers a framework for understanding the links between globalization, health, and gender relations. These very complex connections are explored from two different perspectives: how existing gender relations affect the globalization of health and (more briefly) how the globalization of health may affect future patterns of gender relations. The chapter begins with some preliminary comments on the three different concepts under review: globalization, health, and gender relations.

Keywords

Reproductive Health Informal Sector Gender Inequality Gender Relation Gender Equity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Ilona Kickbusch, Kari A. Hartwig, and Justin M. List 2005

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  • Lesley Doyal

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