Soulcraft as Statecraft? Diplomacy, Conflict Resolution, and Peacebuilding

  • Scott M. Thomas
Part of the Culture and Religion in International Relations book series (CRIR)

Abstract

There have always been people of good will belonging to different faith communities—or none, who in the past have devised peace plans, promoted interfaith dialogue, and in a variety of ways worked for a world without war. A variety of religious groups or religious traditions, Buddhists as well as Quakers and Mennonites, for example, have been committed to peace and conflict resolution as an integral part of their religious tradition.

Keywords

Europe Egypt Defend OECD Sudan 

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Copyright information

© Scott M. Thomas 2005

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  • Scott M. Thomas

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