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Wars and Rumors of War? Religion and International Conflict

  • Scott M. Thomas
Part of the Culture and Religion in International Relations book series (CRIR)

Abstract

Religious and political leaders of all stripes claimed in the aftermath of September 11 that religion had nothing, or almost nothing, to do with the terrorist attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center. They rejected the notion that religion—or, Islam in particular—was responsible for international conflict. All of the world’s great religious traditions —“rightly understood”—so their adherents say, almost in the form of a postmodern cliché, preach a message of peace and goodwill.

Keywords

Religious Tradition Child Soldier Triangular Structure Ethnic Conflict Islamic World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Scott M. Thomas 2005

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  • Scott M. Thomas

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