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The Soul of the World? Religious Non-State Actors and International Relations Theory

  • Scott M. Thomas
Part of the Culture and Religion in International Relations book series (CRIR)

Abstract

What is the power of religion and how does it operate in the secular world of international relations? The communist leaders in Poland and the Soviet Union discovered that the pope had no army divisions but he had legions of followers. So did Francis of Assisi in his day, and so do the Franciscans and the Sufi orders, and the Dalai Lama and Osama bin Laden, and countless other religious leaders, orders, and movements in our time. How should we understand the meaning and influence of these religious non-state actors or nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in international relations today?

Keywords

Social Movement International Relation World Politics Epistemic Community Causal Belief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Scott M. Thomas 2005

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  • Scott M. Thomas

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