Advertisement

Afterword: What Are We Talking About When We Talk About Zombies?

  • William Egginton
Chapter

Abstract

This afterword argues that what unifies as well as distinguishes this volume from the many analyses that have preceded it is the combination of a historical materialist approach to explaining the popularity of the undead with an unusual openness to questioning the underlying assumptions and efficacy of such explanations. In other words, the authors assembled here manage both to ask what zombies mean in late capitalist society and what it can possibly mean for zombies to mean something.

Keywords

Unconscious Knowledge Unusual Openness Communist Threat Disparate Indi Objective Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Kyle Bishop, “Dead Man Still Walking: Explaining the Zombie Renaissance,” Journal of Popular Film & Television 37, no. 1 (2009): 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Joel Bakan, The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power (New York: Free Press, 2004), 1.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Niklas Luhmann, “Globalization or World Society? How to Conceive of Modern Society,” International Review of Sociology 7, no. 1 (1997): 67CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Martin Ford, Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future (New York: Basic Books, 2015).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Immanuel Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment, ed. Paul Guyer, trans. Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Jacques Lacan, Ecrits, trans. Bruce Fink (New York: Norton, 2002), 671–702.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© David R. Castillo, David Schmid, David A. Reilly and John Edgar Browning 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Egginton

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations