‘Extraordinary cheeriness and good will’

The Uses and Documentation of First World War Slang
  • Julie Coleman
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Languages at War book series (PASLW)

Abstract

First World War slang provides a glimpse into the human experience of war, particularly into the tension created by formal and informal prohibitions on normal human reactions to the terror and horror of trench warfare. This chapter uses newspaper coverage of First World War slang to provide a context for its more detailed documentation in dictionaries and glossaries (see Coleman 2008). It explores the manifest and subliminal functions played by soldiers’ slang in newspapers and books and on the stage, as well as in other forms of public discourse, both while the war was underway and afterwards, into the early 1920s.

Keywords

Newspaper Coverage American Soldier British Army Downing Street British Soldier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie Coleman

There are no affiliations available

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