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Conclusions

  • Matt Long
  • Roger Hopkins Burke
Part of the Critical Criminological Perspectives book series (CCRP)

Abstract

We will commence this concluding chapter by reviewing the story sofar. Thus, we began our tale by looking at how the label ‘vandal’ has its etymological origins in an East German tribe of that name in the fourth and the fifth centuries who invaded Western Europe, destroying cities, including the so-called sack of Rome in 455. Our first substantive chapter made the point that the implication that ‘vandals’ are a ‘class’ or even a ‘race’ apart, does not square with the evidence that as the most common of all offences in the criminal code, many people will have committed at least one act of vandalism during their life. That first chapter charted how it was only from the nineteenth century onwards that the notion of the ‘vandal’ was used to describe a social practice — namely that of property destruction — rather than referring to specific group of people with common characteristics.

Keywords

Social Practice Hate Crime Criminal Code Criminal Responsibility Critical Criminology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Matt Long and Roger Hopkins Burke 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matt Long
    • 1
  • Roger Hopkins Burke
    • 1
  1. 1.Nottingham Trent UniversityUK

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