Advertisement

American Military Demographics

Chapter

Abstract

The present state of the American military is often misunderstood. That misunderstanding leads to incorrect conclusions about the politics and voting behavior of service personnel. Given the known relationship between voter demographics and voter behavior, it is essential that the armed services demographics, particularly the characteristics of enlisted personnel, be presented to show how they may be different from those of officers or the general American voting population. This chapter will establish the “ground truth” of the present state of American military demographics, particularly those of enlisted personnel, using official data from Department of Defense (DOD) sources and supported by other data sources.

Keywords

Census Tract Military Personnel Service Member Active Duty Heritage Foundation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    See Richard H. Kohn. 1974. “The All-Volunteer Army: Too High a Price?” Proceedings of the U.S. Naval Institut. 100(3/853): 35–42;Google Scholar
  2. Vincent Davis. 1974. “The Deterioration of Popular Willingness to Serve,” in New Civil-Military Relations: The Agonies of Adjustment to Post-Vietnam Realitie., ed. John P. Lovell and Philip S. Kronenberg. New Brunswick: Transaction Books;Google Scholar
  3. Jerald G. Bachman, John D. Blair, and David R. Segal. 1977. The All-Volunteer Force: A Study in Military Ideology. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
  4. 2.
    David J. Armor and Curtis L. Gilroy. 2007. “Changing Minority Representation in the U.S. Military,” paper presented at Biennial Conference of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society, Chicago, October 26.Google Scholar
  5. 3.
    Christine O. Hardyman. 1988. Department of the Army Historical Summary, Fiscal Year 1982. Center of Military History, Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Army.Google Scholar
  6. 5.
    Tim Kane. 2005. “Who Bears the Burden? Demographic Characteristics of U.S. Military Recruits Before and After 9/11,” Center for Data Analysis Repor. No. CDA05–08, November 7. Washington, DC: Heritage Foundation;Google Scholar
  7. Tim Kane. 2006. “Who Are the Recruits? The Demographics of U.S. Military Enlistment, 2003–2005,” Center for Data Analysis Repor. No. CDA06–09, October 26. Washington, DC: Heritage Foundation;Google Scholar
  8. Shanea J. Watkins and James Sherk. 2008. “Who Serves in the U.S. Military? Demographic Characteristics of Enlisted Troops and Officers.” Center for Data Analysis Repor. No. CDA08-05, August 21. Washington, DC: Heritage Foundation.Google Scholar
  9. 12.
    Tim Kane. 2005. “Who Bears the Burden?”; Tim Kane. 2006. “Who Are the Recruits?”Google Scholar
  10. Also see Watkins and Sherk. 2008. “Who Serves in the U.S. Military?”Google Scholar
  11. 13.
    US Congressional Budget Office. 2007. “The All-Volunteer Military: Issues and Performance,”Google Scholar
  12. 15.
    National Center for Education Statistics. 2004. Digest of Education Statistics, 200. (NCES 2006-0005). Washington, DC: US Department of Education.Google Scholar
  13. 16.
    National Center for Education Statistics. 2005. The Condition of Education 2005, Indicator 20, Immediate Transition to Colleg. (NCES 2005–094). Washington, DC: US Department of Education.Google Scholar
  14. 18.
    US Census Bureau. 2005. United States Census 200.Google Scholar
  15. 19.
    Watkins and Sherk. 2008. “Who Serves in the U.S. Military?”Google Scholar
  16. 20.
    See Kane. 2005. “Who Bears the Burden?”Google Scholar
  17. and Kane. 2006. “Who Are the Recruits?”Google Scholar
  18. 21.
    Constance M. Carroll. 2008. Chancellor’s Welcome.Google Scholar
  19. 23.
    Steven Ruggles, Matthew Sobek, Trent Alexander, Catherine A. Fitch, Ronald Goeken, Patricia Kelly Hall, Miriam King, and Chat Ronnander. 2008. “Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 4.0,”Google Scholar
  20. 24.
    Michael McDonald. 2008. “2008 General Election Turnout Rates,” United States Elections Project. http://www.electproject.org/2008g. Accessed March 4, 2015.Google Scholar
  21. 27.
    See Ann Scott Tyson. 2006. “Youths in Rural U.S. Are Drawn to Military: Recruits’ Job Worries Outweigh War Fears,” The Washington Pos., p. A1, November 4;Google Scholar
  22. Tom Bowman. 2006. “Army Accepting More Recruits with Criminal, Drug Histories,” Los Angeles Time., A14, February 14;Google Scholar
  23. and Juan Gonzalez. 2005. “Racial Divide Evident in Military,” Daily New. (New York), p. 16, November 8.Google Scholar
  24. 28.
    Tom Bowman. 2005. “Lowered Standards Help Army Meet Recruit Goals.” Baltimore Su., A10, November 8.Google Scholar
  25. 29.
    Charles Rangel. 2006a. “Rangel Reintroduces Draft Bill.”Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Donald S. Inbody 2016

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations