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American Military Political Behavior

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Abstract

So, how do soldiers vote? We know more now than we did a decade ago, but we know less than we do about the general population. The short answer, though, is that soldiers vote much like most Americans and the usual demographic predictors are good. The slightly longer answer is that officers who tend to vote for Republicans while enlisted are more evenly divided in their support for the two major political parties.

Keywords

Military Personnel Political Ideology Democratic Party Party Identification Senior Officer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Donald S. Inbody 2016

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