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The Postcolonial Repatriations of the French of Algeria in 1962: An Emblematic Case of a Public Integration Policy

  • Yann Scioldo-Zürcher

Abstract

The singular place of French ‘repatriates’ (rapatriés) from Algeria in a general history of immigration to France lies in the link that formed between the host country and those who, as migrants, were both nationals and citizens of the country they were moving to.1 These ‘national migrants’, who in the legal sense were neither immigrants (while experiencing a similar form of migration) nor refugees (as designated by the French Office for the Protection of Refugees and Stateless Persons (OFPRA), and various international organizations), but most certainly repatriates, came under the provisions of a proliferating mass of legislation and innovative administrative practices.2 And despite a collective memory of trauma and victimhood in which the French government was accused of ‘abandoning them to their fate’, we find, on the contrary, the rapid creation of a policy of integration into mainland France and a readiness on the part of the authorities to meet the needs involved quickly and appropriately.

Notes

Keywords

Minimum Wage Civil Servant Integration Policy Wage Earner Legal Empowerment 
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Notes

  1. 2.
    Yann Scioldo-Zürcher, Devenir métropolitain: politique d’intégration et parcours de rapatriés d’Algérie en métropole (1954–2005) (Paris, 2010).Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Gérard Noiriel, Introduction à la socio-histoire (Paris, 2006), 8 and passim. Dear to the hearts of socio-historians, Durkheim’s concept of ‘long-distance relations’ enables an analysis of the propinquities arising between a state and a particular group of migrants, and, in the present instance, a clarification of the specific integration policy established for French repatriates from Algeria.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    See, among others, Todd Shepard, The Invention of Decolonization: The Algerian War and the Remaking of France (Ithaca, 2008). On the two German cases, see Michael Schwartz’s chapter in this volume.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    Yann Scioldo-Zürcher, ‘La discrète mais réelle anticipation du rapatriement des Français d’Algérie: la construction de la loi du 26 décembre 1961’, in Abderrahmane Bouchène, Jean-Pierre Peyroulou, Quanassa Siari Tengour, and Sylvie Thénault, eds, Histoire de l’Algérie à la période coloniale 1830–1962 (Paris, 2012), 564–9.Google Scholar
  5. 48.
    Jean-Marie Fecteau and Janice Harvey, eds, La régulation sociale entre l’acteur et l’institution, pour une problématique historique de l’interaction (Sainte-Foy, Quebec, 2005).Google Scholar
  6. 49.
    Yann Scioldo-Zürcher, ‘The Cost of Decolonisation: Compensating the Repatriates’, in Émile Chabal, ed., France since the 1970s: History, Politics and Memory in an Age of Uncertainty (London, 2014), 99–114.Google Scholar

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© Yann Scioldo-Zürcher 2016

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  • Yann Scioldo-Zürcher

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